Sarcophagus of Tuthmosis the First

The sarcophagus of Tuthmosis the First, like many royal sarcophagi of the early Eighteenth Dynasty, was carved from crystalline sandstone quartzite. The ancient Egyptians associated this material, which was quarried near the city of the sun, Heliopolis, with the cult of the sun.

The end facing the viewer corresponds to the feet of the mummy. Isis crouches upon the "Neb" sign for gold and holds the Shen ring for protection. Nepthys appears in a similar pose on the opposite end of the sarcophagus. Each goddess displays her own particular symbol upon her head above the Khat headdress with the frontal uraeus, or royal cobra.

Sarcophagus of Tuthmosis the First

The two long sides show the four sons of Horus in pairs and the god Anubis. The left side is adorned with the two Udjat eyes. The formulas concern the protection and preservation of the body.  This sarcophagus belonged originally to Hatshepsut after she became the ruler. On the occasion of the transfer of her father's mummy, it was inscribed for Tuthmosis the First and transferred to the queen's tomb.









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