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Kemet Definition

 
Egypt the world’s first superpower was born about 5000 b.c.e. in the valley of the Nile River in northeastern Africa. Tucked into a long, narrow gorge threaded by the river and bounded by steep cliffs, Egypt enjoyed a predictable, mostly pleasant climate and natural barriers against invasion. To the west lay the Sahara Desert, to the east a harsh, mountainous wasteland.

Kemet Definition
Kemet Definition
Kemet Meaning



To the south, a series of six great rapids (called cataracts) obstructed the river. To the north was the “Great Green:” the Mediterranean Sea. An Egyptian called his homeland Kemet. His world was divided into lowland Kemet (“black land”), the narrow ribbon of rich, black earth on the valley floor, and highland deshret (“red land”), the pale, reddish sand of the forbidding desert plateaus.

Foreigners were “highlanders.” “Going up” meant leaving the valley; “descending” was returning home. Egypt was a long, narrow oasis carved by the Nile River through the harsh desert. 

“The Egypt to which we sail nowadays is… the gift of the river,” said Greek historian and traveler Herodotus. The Nile, one of the world’s longest rivers, flows more than 4,200 miles north from central Africa to the Mediterranean. The name “Nile” comes from the Greek word Neilos, but the Egyptians called it simply iteru, “the river.”
 
 

 Ancient Kemet pictures

 
 
 
Kemetic Meaning

Kemetic Meaning

Kemetic Meaning

Kemetic Meaning

Kemetic Meaning

Kemetic Meaning

Kemetic Meaning

Kemetic Meaning

Kemetic Meaning

Kemetic Meaning

Kemetic Meaning
Kemetic Meaning
Kemetic Meaning
 
 
 
 
 



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