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Luxor Ancient Egypt

The Luxor area was a great city of ancient Egypt. It was the Thebes of Egyptians and the city of Amon- Ra. The city was regarded in the Ancient Egyptian texts as the 'city of the sceptre'. Thebes was also known as "the city of the 100 gates", sometimes being called "southern Heliopolis".

"Luxor" derives from the Arabic al-uksur, meaning "fortifications". Immediately opposite of the city are the monuments, temples, tombs including the Valley of the Kings and the Valley of the Queens.


Luxor Ancient Egypt

Luxor Ancient Egypt



Luxor Ancient Egypt

Luxor Ancient Egypt

Luxor Ancient Egypt

Luxor Ancient Egypt

Luxor Ancient Egypt

Luxor Ancient Egypt

Luxor Ancient Egypt

Luxor Ancient Egypt

Luxor Ancient Egypt

Luxor Ancient Egypt

Luxor Ancient Egypt

Luxor Ancient Egypt

Luxor Ancient Egypt

Luxor Ancient Egypt

Luxor Ancient Egypt

Luxor Ancient Egypt

Luxor Ancient Egypt

Luxor Ancient Egypt

Luxor Ancient Egypt

Luxor Ancient Egypt

Luxor Ancient Egypt

Luxor Ancient Egypt

Luxor Ancient Egypt

Luxor Ancient Egypt

Luxor Ancient Egypt

Luxor Ancient Egypt

Luxor Ancient Egypt

Luxor Ancient Egypt


Luxor Ancient Egypt

Luxor Ancient Egypt



It rose to significance during the Middle kingdom. It was the capital of Egypt during the Middle and New kingdoms. Luxor grew as a high centre for art and wisdom during the 11th dynasty itself. The main god of the city was Amon, who was worshipped together with his wife, the Goddess Mut, and their son Khonsu, the God of the moon.

At the northern end of town is the sprawling Karnak complex of temples built over a span of about 1,500 years. It is famous for its main Hypostyle Hall with 134 massive columns.

The temple at Luxor is built by two kings, Amenhotep III, the inner part and Ramesses II, the outer part. The overall length of the temple between the pylon and rear wall measures about 189.89 by 55.17 meters.

 The original function of the temple of Luxor, apparently dedicated to the Theban Triad of Amun, Mut and their son Khonsu, appears uncertain. The political and military importance of Luxor disappeared in the late period, and it was replaced by other cities.


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