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King Ramesses the Great and the God Ptah Tatenen

The Statue of King Ramesses the Great and the God Ptah Tatenen


This statue depicts King Ramesses the Second and the god Ptah Tatenen on his left, seated on a high-backed chair. Ptah Tatenen, surnamed the "Father of the King," has put his arms around the Pharaoh's back. This attitude identifies Ramesses the Second with the god and is a sign of his deification, which all his monuments proclaim.

King Ramesses the Great and the God Ptah Tatenen


Ramesses the Second wears the Shendyt kilt, and the striped Nemes headdress protected by a uraeus, or royal cobra. The false beard is attached to his chin by two bands that join the headdress. He is shown with the characteristic, idealized features of a young man, with narrow, elongated eyes and a full mouth. 
 
The god wears a wig and holds the Ankh sign, the symbol of long life. The back of the chair is engraved with text and the royal cartouches of Ramesses the Second. The Sema-tawy symbol of the unification of the two lands adorns both sides of the chair.
 
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